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Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs is an easy meatball recipe with uncooked brown rice, ground turkey, eggs and chicken stock. Cooked in a crock pot for 4-8 hours. | ifoodreal.com

My Monday morning was unrolling so lovely. I was looking forward to working on these slow cooker porcupine meatballs post after posting my first ever What I Ate Weekend post. Kids were up early due to a time change. No rain. Laundry in. Lovely. Everything was going lovely. I even texted Alex how lovely our weekend was (we even started a 1000 piece puzzle which I think I’m the only one excited about, girls vs. boys) and how blessed we are. Amen.

A beeping noise from upstairs and our a year old washer has an error message. I hate technology of 2016 with all my heart! The door is locked with a dark load inside. Which means ALL my Lululemon pants. Um, yes. How lovely!

Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs is an easy meatball recipe with uncooked brown rice, ground turkey, eggs and chicken stock. Cooked in a crock pot for 4-8 hours. | ifoodreal.com

So, I’m trying really hard to just enjoy talking about my healthy turkey porcupine meatballs and not to think of a possible $300 part replacement and another $120 service call. But I still feel so sad. Alex will try to take it apart tonight and follow some Youtube repair suggestions (because we are Russians) but I have little hope and feel like China has won again. 🙁 Where can I get an appliance made in Canada?! Seriously?!

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I never ever realized that America knows my childhood easy meatball recipe with rice. My mom made “hedgehog” meatballs all the time. When I first googled to see what comes up for “meatballs rice” I saw porcupine meatballs. Honestly, at first I thought they were made with porcupine meat until I saw images of a spiky animal at the top of the page. No judgement. I was working with little people back from school.

Hold on, Olena. Mommy’s brain alert. Russian hedgehog = American porcupine. Just 10 times bigger. Well, just like everything else in America. But same spikes and needles. OK, got it.

Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs is an easy meatball recipe with uncooked brown rice, ground turkey, eggs and chicken stock. Cooked in a crock pot for 4-8 hours. | ifoodreal.com

These turkey meatballs with brown rice are called “porcupine meatballs” because when rice is cooked it is sticking out from the meatballs like needles. My mom always made porcupine meatballs in a clear sauce made out of broth and spices. Where as I noticed all American recipes come up with tomato sauce.

Also my mom and I made the meatballs large. Like you will eat 1-2 meatballs only. That is how we made them. This recipe yields 10 large porcupine balls.

I decided to make slow cooker porcupine meatballs because I thought they make a perfect candidate for a no pre-cooking crock pot recipe. Even brown rice is uncooked. The liquid and steam over 8-10 hours should be plenty to cook the rice. Plus while rice is slowly expanding it acts as a binder along with eggs to keep ground turkey shaped into meatballs.

Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs is an easy meatball recipe with uncooked brown rice, ground turkey, eggs and chicken stock. Cooked in a crock pot for 4-8 hours. | ifoodreal.com

For my mom’s version of porcupine meatballs I used vegetable stock made with organic bouillon cubes and a bit of cornstarch to thicken it. I love buying the cubes because then I can have as much stock as I want whenever I want. As opposed to homemade one that needs to be defrosted and takes a lot of room in the freezer. And store bought carton broth is so expensive plus has to be used up ASAP. Organic bouillon cubes are the best!

Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs is an easy meatball recipe with uncooked brown rice, ground turkey, eggs and chicken stock. Cooked in a crock pot for 4-8 hours. | ifoodreal.com

These slow cooker porcupine meatballs came out amazing! I promise! They held their shape. They were flavourful and tender. And so juicy and a bit saucy. Not to mention how filling these rice meatballs are on their own because of brown rice + turkey. They freeze well too!

I have to tell you that I posted this recipe about 3 years ago and this is an improved version. There were some concerns about my old recipe which I rectified. There were some upset readers mainly about cooking time. It is all fixed. All fixed. I promise!

Enjoy!

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Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs with Brown Rice

Slow Cooker Porcupine Meatballs with Brown Rice

Ingredients

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, add turkey, rice, eggs, salt, Italian seasoning and pepper. Using your hands, mix very well.
  2. Form 10 large meatballs a size just a bit shy of a tennis ball’s size. Place in a single layer on a bottom of a large slow cooker. Meatballs will fit snuggly. Just pack them gently and tight.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk broth with cornstarch and pour gently over the meatballs. Cover and cook on Low for 7-8 hours or on High for 3-4 hours. Serve hot with a salad or a green smoothie.
  4. Storage Instructions: Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 5 days or freeze for up to 3 months.

Notes

*Rice is not cooked or pre-cooked.

http://ifoodreal.com/slow-cooker-porcupine-meatballs/

Nutritional Info

Servings Per Recipe: 10

Amount Per Serving = 1 meatball:
Calories: 209.4
Total Fat: 8.0 g
Cholesterol: 101.2 mg
Sodium: 314.7 mg
Total Carbs: 14.8 g
Dietary Fiber: 0.8 g
Protein: 20.5 g
WW Points+: 5

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10 Comments

  1. Olena

    You know, I have 2 different crock pots and in one of them it took me 3 – 4 hours. However, the new one I got would take longer. Believe it or not, I was surprised. I would say on High for 2.5 – 3 hours they should be fine. I would peek inside and see when rice is done and “prickly” sticking out, the meatballs are done. Ground meat cooks pretty fast too. Hope they turned out well for you!

    Reply
  2. Olena

    Hi Erin. You know, this is one of my first recipes I ever posted 3 years ago and it had ben on my re-test list. I you like the flavour you can just let the meatballs cook longer.

    Reply
  3. Olena

    Considering I think ground turkey is delicious on its own with just salt and pepper, I have a hard time to believe these meatballs are flavourful. There is a category of people who think chicken and turkey have no flavour. We eat clean so to me poultry has a ton of flavour on its own.
    I have to say this but you haven’t been hungry enough in your life that is why calling this recipe a waste of turkey. If things are that bad on your end, go buy a jar of pasta sauce, mix with “a soggy mess” and serve with quinoa or pasta. What is a big freaking deal? Seriously.

    Reply
  4. Hannah

    Haha, I got so excited when I read “Porcupine Meatballs” when I got to your page! My mom made them quite frequently as I was growing up (usually with beef or lamb), and I haven’t seen them around forever. Thanks for reminding me about them 😉 These look great.

    Reply
    • Olena

      Hi Hannah. I have never heard anyone mentioning porcupine meatballs here in Canada that is why I was confused when they came up in the search haha. I mean I’m not dumb-dumb but I don’t hear of porcupine often and there are so many wild meats people cook with here so for a second I had a thought this is some delicacy meatballs LOL. It must be a very old recipe that is not super popular right now. In Ukraine it is an ancient recipe so I was super stoked to see someone might recognize my meatballs here. My mom always made meatballs with pork or beef. All we had. Ground chicken was expensive. No turkey.

      Reply

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