28 comments already!

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

+20 C outside and my slightly enlarged mid section after hibernation made me stop eating bread. I came to terms that low rise Lululemon pants are going on Ebay. Thankfully, it took them only about 10 years to start making high waist leggings. Hello?! Like what sane girl doesn’t want all her “junk in the trunk”?!

Well, maybe except Tone It Up girls and 15 year olds. I do hope no suicides were committed among “normal” female population although I have seen a few broken hearts on Instagram. The girls look great and a pleasure to look at but let’s get real –  what mom has time to swing legs in the air on a beach and can eat 150 calories meals?! Ain’t nobody got time for that! Bahaha, remember that awesome lady?!

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

So, in light of soon to be exposed body parts I decided to try quinoa bread recipe. No idea where idea came from. I have been running and working out, cutting carbs during dinner time and now I just wanted to have a slice of bread in a fridge that is higher in protein and more complete nutrition than sprouted whole grain bread. More like a side of quinoa with my meal that is always there waiting for me in a fridge.

New goal is to keep high rise Lululemon leggings away from Ebay. I refuse to change my clothes size which helped me stay in shape over the years.

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

There are no unknown ingredients in this gluten free quinoa bread recipe. I promise, you know me. I have found this recipe and had completely changed it from wheat to gluten free. I placed 2 cups of raw quinoa in my absolutely stunning new mini Blendtec jar and voila 2 minutes later. I have not tried using store bought quinoa flour so don’t hold me to how much of that substitute to use. I don’t know. The safest is to grind your own quinoa into flour.

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

This is a no yeast sandwich style, gluten free and vegan bread recipe. Wow, I ticked them all off considering I do not fit any of them but was fun. Honestly, yeast scares me because my mom never baked. Let’s face it, I mean I could learn for sure but eating an army of tested breads scares the shit out of me.

I have a rule – I do not cook or buy something I don’t want or don’t need to eat. Danger-danger, especially after a glass of wine.

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

I mixed homemade quinoa flour with oat flour which produced amazingly nutty taste bread. I have tried this quinoa bread recipe with whole wheat flour first time and I prefer oat flour. Which is weird because oat flour tastes yucky often. A note, you can grind quick or rolled oats into a flour just like quinoa.

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

Quinoa bread is quite firm. After it cools off you can slice it like regular wheat bread and even toast. See, it doesn’t fall apart.

Also, this quinoa bread recipe is extremely easy for any novice cook to alternative baking like me. You don’t have to worry about yeast rising, proper temperatures and elevations, or over mixing the dough.

Quinoa Bread Recipe is yeast and gluten free made with dry quinoa, oat flour, coconut oil and almond milk. Very simple ingredients. | ifoodreal.com

What are you up to this weekend? I have 5 ball and ice hockey “dates” for the boys. It will be an interesting season as I already showed up in one place with a wrong child. It is my 1st out of 8 more seasons where both kids play same sports. Pray for me! I plan to stay sane with wine but not too much since early wake ups.

I have no idea what is on the menu this weekend. I plan to take everyone out to eat once and I am sure canned salmon will make its appearance.

Alex will be replacing turf in our backyard. I cleaned our deck a bit and will wash porches and patio furniture and make it all nice for next 6 months of living outdoors. Yay! I think I also should organize my storage as now I have no excuses since I got a cleaning lady to clean my house. Yay!

Have a great and safe weekend!

Quinoa Bread Recipe

Quinoa Bread Recipe

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F and grease 8" x 5" loaf tin with butter or coconut oil well.
  2. In a high-speed blender or food processor, grind quinoa for a few minutes until flour forms. Transfer to a large mixing bowl along with oat flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt; stir very well. Add butter or coconut oil and stir until it is incorporated with dry ingredients in small pieces.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk milk, maple syrup and vinegar. Pour into a bowl with dry ingredients and mix well with spatula.
  4. Transfer to a prepared loaf tin, level and sprinkle with sesame seeds if desired. Bake for 60 minutes loosely covered with parchment paper for the first 30 minutes to prevent top from burning. Remove from the oven and let cool for about an hour. Then loosen the sides with a knife, flip the tin and give a few gentle pats on a bottom. Bread should slide out and cool off completely before slicing.
  5. Storage Instructions: Refrigerate in a sealed plastic bag for about 2 weeks. Freeze for up to 3 months.

Notes

*Make oat flour by grinding quick or rolled oats. I think ratio is 1:1 but measure after anyways. Also you can use spelt or whole wheat flour in place of oat flour. Bread will be dryer and nuttier but still good. I prefer oat flour. For gluten free bread version use Gluten Free certified oats.

http://ifoodreal.com/quinoa-bread-recipe/

Nutritional Info

Servings Per Recipe: 10

Amount Per Serving = 1 slice:
Calories: 218.1
Total Fat: 7.5 g
Cholesterol: 0.0 mg
Sodium: 269.7 mg
Total Carbs: 32.1 g
Dietary Fiber: 3.4 g
Protein: 6.0 g
WW Points+: 6

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28 Comments

  1. Kit

    Oh my goodness that sandwich has me drooling and I want the top side too! And is that smoked fish? I’m dying here! Buying jeans I discard them by the zipper length. The short zippers never make it to the changing room. Lately I just buy them and try at home usually end up returning them all. I hate the mirrors and lights in the changing rooms.

    I have a bag of quinoa flour that I bought months ago in curiosity and stuck it in the freezer not knowing what to do. But it’s almost like powder it’s so fine. I wonder if it would would? Yours looks so darned good!

    Reply
    • Olena

      I wholeheartedly agree about light in dressing rooms. I try things at home too. I buy jeans once in 3 years. Only expensive brands fit me well but overallI hate jeans. I live in Lululemon. I buy clothes rarely but when I buy it is one quality piece. I am so sick of cheap China crap. Done with it.
      Yes, that is smoked wild salmon from Costco. I love it! A treat. I wish it was cheaper.
      I’m sure that quinoa flour would work. Mine was fine powder.

      Reply
  2. Thelma

    Can’t wait to try your recipe Olena, unfortunately oats is classed as not gluten free here in Australia. I have bought packaged oats from USA here in a health shop but the standards over there allow a higher level of gluten in this produce. As I am a Coeliac sufferer I have to be careful about gluten. Would plain gluten flour work? Look forward to baking bread 😄

    Reply
    • Olena

      I think gluten free flour would work. It doesn’t rise or absorb liquid much like whole wheat.
      There are no certified gluten free oats in Australia? We have them in North America. I should add that to the recipe. Forgot. Sorry. For those poor people like you who get sick from gluten.

      Reply
      • Thelma

        Thanks Olena, will keep looking. Meanwhile I will give your recipe a go 😜👍🏻

        Reply
  3. Mary

    I made this yummy recipe, but we had to eat it with a spoon! It was very crumbly, it was good, but we couldn’t use it to make sandwiches. Please, do you have any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Olena

      Hi Mary. Hmm, did you use exact same ingredients? Did you make 2 cups of uncooked quinoa into flour? Was your batter as thick as mine in the pictures? Any changes you made to ingredients or process?

      Reply
  4. Franci

    Hi, I love everything you post and I am slowly getting better at cooking your recipes! I am trying to quit with any kind of sugar (even natural ones) so I was wondering: is the syrup/honey really essential in this recipe?

    Reply
    • Olena

      Hi Franci. Yes, sweeter is essential in this recipe not so much for taste purpose but to react with vinegar and baking soda to yield a proper texture bread. 1 tbsp is really nothing per 10 slices of bread.:)

      Reply
  5. Mary

    Olena,
    I like to rinse my quinoa, so I used quinoa flour instead. I used stevia instead of maple syrup or honey. Yes, the batter was thick. The bread was yummy, but I couldn’t slice it, it was very crumbly. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated. Thanks

    Reply
    • Olena

      OK, I think I know what happened. First of all, I indicated 3 cups quinoa flour because that is what it seemed like in my blender. After some research now I found 2 cups raw quinoa translate into 2 2/3 cups quinoa flour. I think that was just too much flour in your recipe. I should have looked into it more carefully since I didn’t try using pre-made quinoa flour. By the way, most quinoa is pre-rinsed. To save money and make recipe work 100% why don’t you try doing what I did?!
      Secondly, that honey is essential for this recipe as it reacts with vinegar and baking soda to add proper texture to bread.
      You definitely should be able to slice this bread and toast when handled carefully. You should be able to make an open face sandwich but probably not a double sandwich wrapped in plastic to toss into a punchbag. Makes sense?

      Reply
  6. Mary

    Sounds like I need to go to the store and buy some honey. Thanks for the suggestions.

    Reply
  7. Naomi

    I made this bread and have just enjoyed the end slice. It turned out much more dense and rose less than in your picture. I followed the recipe exactly except for one thing: 2 cups of quinoa made the 2 2/3 cups of flour like you said, plus another 1/4 to 1/3 cup, and I didn’t add that in. I saved it in case I thought I’d need it, but the dough was pretty thick and I decided against using it. The bread is not really heavy at all in spite of the density of the crumb, although it is a bit bland. I’m wondering if there’s something I can add to perk up the flavor a bit. Also, there is the faintest tinge of bitterness, from not rinsing the quinoa first. It’s not really offensive. I may rinse, or even sprout, my quinoa next time, and dehydrate before milling. The loaf came out of the oven smelling heavenly – like peanut butter! This stuff could grow on me for sure. I thought I’d post a picture but I don’t see that that is an option here.

    Reply
    • Olena

      You can add garlic powder, rosemary and other herbs. Is your baking powder fresh? Sometimes it becomes inactive. Google how to check it. I do not think rinsing quinoa will help get rid off quinoa taste in bread. I could taste quinoa but no bitterness.

      Reply
  8. Zora

    Hi!
    I wander how many cups of quinoa flour would be equivalent to 2 cups of uncooked quinoa needed in this recipe?
    I don’t hv a scale….
    Many thanks…

    Reply
    • Olena

      Hi Zora. I will be perfectly honest. At first, when I posted recipe I thought ground up quinoa is the same as store-bought flour. Then after a few people had issues with bread crumbling I wasn’t so sure anymore. I never actually bought quinoa flour. So, I stopped advising on substituting it. It is quite easy to grind raw quinoa, that is all I tested this recipe with and that is what I recommend to use.

      Reply
  9. Ann

    Made this bread yesterday, using all ingredients called for. Looked beautiful when done. Couldn’t wait for my first slice. The slide simply crumbled. the whole loaf is a crumbled mess. Have no clue why. Will feed it to birds and chipmunks.

    Reply
    • Olena

      Hm, let’s troubleshoot. If the bread looked like mine than recipe worked. This is not a gluten bread. It needs gentle care. It has to be cooled off completely, sliced with serrated bread knife and into thicker slices. This is not a sandwich bread but it can be sliced. I made this recipe 3 times at least and could slice it the way I described.

      Reply
  10. Deb

    I weighed the Quinoa, then ground it. When it came out of the oven it was extremely crumbly. I put it in the fridge in a plastic bag while still warm, and it magically became moist and sliceable.

    Reply
    • Olena

      Yogurt wouldn’t work. I wouldn’t recommend anything else besides milk. Baking is quiet a science and even 2 tbsp short or more of liquid could throw off the recipe.

      Reply
  11. Adelina

    I have been grain free for a few months now, and have been wanting to try a bread recipe to satisfy my bagel with butter and cream cheese cravings…
    I used 2 2/3 c store bought quinoa flour, and subbed the oat flour with 1/3 c coconut flour.
    I wanted to let you know that it came out beautifully! Texture is like a moist banana bread and the flavor is perfect for the butter and cream cheese! It sliced great!

    Reply
  12. Hazel

    I made this subbing store bought quinoa flour (2 and 2/3 cup) because the flavor of my homemade version always seemed bitter and not as tasty. It came out perfect! I also added some seeds to the batter and it was very nice.
    I think if anyone has problems with a crumbly texture it is either that the bread hasn’t cooled completely (it’s hard to resist slicing fresh bread, I know!) or just baking being baking! It’s sort of an art and sometimes things come out perfect, while others they just do what they want ha! Great recipe, thank you so much for sharing it!

    Reply
    • Olena

      Agree 1000%. No matter how many times I stress to let the thing cool down, sure thing someone will ignore this instruction and then complain about recipe didn’t work out. My own mom is a terrible, terrible, terrible recipe follower and can’t bake for this reason. Baking is a science FOR SURE!!! Glad it worked for you!!!

      Reply

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